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Florida restaurants now facing stronger regulations for grease disposal

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New law prohibits use of ?"pump and return" by grease haulers statewide

Florida’s food service businesses are now facing stronger regulations regarding grease disposal, in an effort to prevent clogs, blockages and significant damage to sewer systems. Starting today, restaurants and commercial kitchens across the City of Tampa will begin receiving mailers explaining the change in state law.

Effective July 1, 2022, Senate Bill 1110 is a state law forbidding the use of "pump and return" by grease waste haulers. This bill created Section 403.742, Florida Statutes, making it illegal to return grease waste and graywater to grease interceptors or grease traps. Additionally, the law prohibits disposing of grease waste at locations other than disposal facilities.

Blockages caused by grease can obstruct the flow of water, leading to costly repairs for the City of Tampa. These blockages can cause fatbergs, which are masses made of materials like oil, grease, or "flushable" wipes that collect, grow and eventually block a sewage system or septic tank system.

“Fatbergs pose a big risk to sewers and the people who work in them,” said Eric Weiss, director of the City of Tampa’s Wastewater Department. “When we have a blockage, waste can back up through pipes, causing major flooding in businesses and homes. That’s why the changes in the state law are so important to maintaining our infrastructure and keeping wastewater services running smoothly.”

This new law also requires grease waste haulers to maintain a service manifest, documenting that the grease waste they collect is disposed of at a permitted or certified waste management facility that is authorized to receive grease waste.