An edition of: WaterAtlas.orgPresented By: Orange County, USF Water Institute

Water-Related News

Herbicide Application on Lake Marilyn, 7/19

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/19/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage Spatterdock (lilies) in the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY. DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 5 DAYS.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Lake Down Canals, 7/20

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/20/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage Salvinia and Duckweed in the canals South of Wauseon Bay Connector.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY. DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 5 DAYS.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Lake Pearl West (District 1), 7/19

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/19/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage floating plants in the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: NONE.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Little Lake Conway, 7/18

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/18/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage Hydrilla and floating plants in the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: NONE.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Lakes Black and Tilden, 7/16

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/16/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage floating plants in the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: NONE.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Little Lake Conway (NE Finger Canals), 7/13

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/13/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage algae in the canals.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY. DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 2 DAYS.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

CFWI calls for projects to help meet Florida’s water demands

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Source: Central Florida Water Initiative (CFWI)

A colorful collection of pipes and pumps sits behind a fence in Seminole County. Segments of blue, green and red are riveted together like a sophisticated LEGO set, but this structure is capable of something far more impressive than any toy.

It’s part of an integrated stormwater, reuse, and reclaimed water system that will deliver excess stormwater and reclaimed water from Altamonte Springs to the city of Apopka.

This alternative water supply project is an example of the kinds of projects that the Central Florida Water Initiative (CFWI) is soliciting to meet the area’s future water demands.

Because of the projected limitations on existing sources of water, water suppliers and other stakeholders within the CFWI planning area were recently asked to identify potential water supply and conservation projects to help meet water demands through 2040.

These projects will help manage the region’s water supply needs by providing water to meet a variety of needs, like public supply, agricultural, commercial and recreational, all while sustaining Florida’s water resources and related natural systems.

“Collaboration is a central and vital element to the CFWI. We’ve put out this call for projects because we want to involve our stakeholders in developing solutions to our regional water supply challenges,” said Thomas Kiger, who leads the CFWI Water Projects Options sub-team.

“Our goal is to create a broad suite of water supply and conservation options that will enable us to meet our water supply needs now and into the future.”

Kiger said in addition to water conservation, he anticipates other water supply options will help meet CFWI needs, including surface water, brackish groundwater, an increased use of reclaimed water and aquifer recharge.

The call for projects runs through October 2018. Project options that meet the goals of the

CFWI regional water supply plan will be included in the list.

Stakeholders are encouraged to submit potential projects, even if they are in early planning stages. While submitting a potential project does not commit a stakeholder to build a project, it will provide a central place where water users can collaborate to evaluate future water supply options. These projects will serve as a list of options in the upcoming Regional Water Supply Plan from which local governments, utilities and others can choose to help meet their water demands over time.

Herbicide Application on Lake Cypress Estes, 7/12

The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/12/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage Hydrilla in the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: NONE.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Lake Irma, 7/11

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 7/11/18. This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage floating vegetation and grasses in the SW canal.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY. DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 5 DAYS.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

New Wekiva Basin plan going into effect in July

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An Update on the Wekiva Basin Management Action Plan (BMAP) from Orange County Commissioner Rod Love:

This week at the meeting of the Orange County Board of County Commissioners, Orange County’s Environmental Protection Division (EPD) provided an update on the progress of the Wekiva Basin Management Action Plan (BMAP) during a work session. This work session provided an update on activities that have occurred since the first work session that took place at the March 6th, 2018 Board meeting.

During the Board meeting on January 9th, 2018, City of Apopka Mayor Bryan Nelson (then Commissioner Nelson) had brought up the topic of the Wekiva BMAP as an open discussion item, where he expressed concerns posed by residents about the required nitrogen reduction plan and how various stakeholders would cover those associated costs. In response to these concerns, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs asked staff to schedule a series of work sessions for the Board to hold a discussion on the issue.

The first work session provided an overview of the Wekiva BMAP, which included its history and the requirement to update the BMAP by July 1st, 2018, with a 20 year project plan for the stakeholders to collectively meet the Total Maximum Daily Load by reducing the total nitrogen loading to the basin, impairing Wekiwa Spring and Rock Springs. Additionally, a representative from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) also discussed the details of BMAP revisions required by recent statute changes that include the 2016 Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act (Florida Statutes sections 373.801-373.813). The 2016 Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act requires a BMAP for Wekiwa and Rock Springs. According to FDEP, the Act requires that there be a Priority Focus Area (PFA) boundary; a nitrogen reduction goal (of ~209,000 Ibs TN/yr for the Wekiva Basin); within a 20 year timeframe with 5, 10, and 15 year milestones; a septic remediation plan in the PFA (required if ≥ 20% nitrogen load from septic); and an education plan.. To date, Orange County has submitted 86 projects in the following categories and amounts: Wastewater (39); stormwater/MS4 (38); land conservation (4); education (1); and septic (4). Out of all the areas included in the BMAP, Orange County is considered the largest stakeholder.

Environmental dilemma may cost Orange County homeowners

ORLANDO – Homeowners in Orange County may have to make some pricey changes to their properties after a statewide study shows septic systems could be causing long term pollution problems in the Wekiwa Springs area.

In 2016, Florida Legislators voted to identify which Florida Springs needed to be part of a restoration program.

Following a series of algae blooms in the Indian River Lagoon, and South Florida in 2016, Florida Legislators decided to take a closer look at Florida waterways. They identified 30 waterways which need additional protection and created the Basin Management Action Plans.

Among the waterways, the Action Plan will affect the Wekiwa and Rock Springs water basin in upper West Orange County .

Starting July 1, the Basin Management Action Plan goes into effect, which means around 21,000 homeowners will have to follow stricter guidelines concerning their septic systems in the near future.

Advocates say springs need more help as State adopts clean-up plans

Advocates are raising concerns about state plans for cleaning up Florida’s ailing springs.

Environmental advocates say the plans for addressing nutrient pollution in 24 Florida springs are incomplete, overly optimistic and ignore the 2016 legislation calling for the action.

Bob Knight of the Florida Springs Institute says the plans are based on one underway in the Sante Fe River, which has not been successful.

“They’re not going to make any difference. They’re not going to put a dent in the problem even in 20 years. the money is not there. The will power is not there to do what actually needs to be done.”

Among the springs targeted are the Blue, DeLeon, Gemini, Rock and Wekiwa in central Florida. Drew Bartlett of the state Department of Environmental Protection describes the plans as pivotal in the springs’ clean-up.

“This is implementing the Springs and Aquifer Protection Act that was passed two years ago, and it has more tools for remediation of septic systems, for wastewater treatment plants.”