An edition of: WaterAtlas.orgPresented By: Orange County, USF Water Institute

Water-Related News

Pet owner, riverkeeper warn about deadly algae also found in St. Johns River

Melissa Martin and her wife's worlds were crushed Thursday. They brought their three dogs, Harpo, Abby and Izzy to play near a pond in North Carolina.

Not long after they got home, their dogs started acting strange, showing signs of liver failure. According to Martin, Harpo was the only one of the three to get in the water. Abby and Izzy just walked down to the water’s edge.

“By the time I got downstairs and to my car, she [Abby] was in a full-blown seizure. Her body was almost in the letter 'C,'” Martin said.

They rushed them all to the hospital, but it was too late.

"Within two hours, we had to put all three down," Martin said.

Herbicide Application on Lake Conway (Barby canal), 8/20

OCAlerts logo

The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 8/20/19.

This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage floating vegetation in the canal.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS:
•  DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY.
•  DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 5 DAYS.

These restrictions apply to the Barby canal only.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

The above listed restrictions apply only to the area indicated in red in the image below:

Barby Canal

Herbicide Application on Lake Olivia, 8/16

OCAlerts logo

The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 8/16/19.

This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage Water Hyacinths throughout the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS:
•  DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY.
•  DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Almost half of Florida water bodies have algal blooms, and climate change is worsening the problem

Florida — home of armed iguana hunters, exploding toilets, and the nation's grandparents — just so happens to be the perfect petri dish for algal blooms. Because blue-green algae absorb energy from the sun and quickly grow in warm freshwater, the Sunshine State offers optimal conditions for the microorganisms called cyanobacteria to thrive.

Nearly all of Lake Okeechobee was covered in cyanobacteria in 2018, and the bacteria has returned this summer. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection tested 108 bodies of water statewide in the past month, and 44 percent had algal blooms. Eight sites were tested in Broward County in the past two weeks. Algal blooms were found in all but one.

"We have a problem," says Soren Rundquist, the director of spatial analysis for the nonprofit Environmental Working Group. "Florida's warmer climate is naturally conducive to algal blooms."

USF's poop-powered generator could have worldwide impact

Flowers are blooming in an unconventional spot. It's a vertical hydroponic wall attached to a small generator.

"Which is basically making use of the nutrients and water recovered from the waste water that our system is treating," explained University of South Florida researcher Jorge Calabria.

The mini sewage system is called the NEWgenerator. It was developed by USF engineering professor Dr. Daniel Yeh and his research team.

“NEW" stands for nutrients, energy and water, which the generator recovers from human waste.

"This system works well,” said Yeh. “It allows us to get rid of our waste and actually recover clean waterfrom that.”

It also harnesses energy.

"Think of this as a renewable natural gas that's sitting in our waste and we're, for the most part, not mining that. So we can mine that for heating water, cooking, generating electricity, a number of uses," explained Yeh. 

Herbicide Application on Lake Marilyn, 8/13

OCAlerts logo

The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 8/13/19.

This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage Spatterdock (lilies) in the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: NONE.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Nokomis Area Civic Association water symposium well attended

There was a full house at the Nokomis Community Center for Wednesday evening’s Water Symposium, sponsored by the Nokomis Area Civic Association.

John McCarthy, Executive Director of Historic Spanish Point, emceed the event that drew more than 100 attendees.

He began the evening with a short slide presentation documenting changing newspaper headlines from the 1920s, when hundreds of thousands of Gulf fish were caught and transported north, to today’s headlines on beach closures due to fecal bacteria, flesh eating bacteria incidents, and the area’s ongoing recovery after last year’s devastating red tide bloom.

“Something’s gotta give,” McCarthy said.

A new old way to combat toxic algae: float it up, then skim it off

In Florida, the Army Corps of Engineers is working to combat a growing environmental menace: blue-green algae. Nitrogen and phosphorus runoff from farms and subdivisions combines with warm summer weather to create massive blooms of algae in rivers and lakes that can be toxic.

In central Florida, Lake Okeechobee has been hit hard in recent years. In Moore Haven, on the western shore of the lake, Dan Levy was recently working on a solution. He was standing on a platform peering into a large water-filled tank. Inside, floating on top of the water was a thick mat of blue-green algae. "This is our treatment system," said Levy. "This is where we actually float the algae up and skim it across."

Levy is with AECOM, an engineering and infrastructure company that's working with the Army Corps of Engineers on the nagging and sometimes devastating problem. Algal blooms aren't just a nuisance. The algae, actually cyanobacteria, can produce toxins that threaten drinking water supplies, local economies and human health.